Posted by: Jacqui Murray | February 25, 2015

Wednesday Hero: Cpt. Joseph O’Callahan

Cpt. Joseph O’Callahan
58 years old from Worcester, Mass
Naval Reserve Chaplain Corps, USS Franklin
May 14, 1905 – March 18, 1964

From Cpt. O’Callahan’s Medal Of Honor citation:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as chaplain on board the U.S.S. Franklin when that vessel was fiercely attacked by enemy Japanese aircraft during offensive operations near Kobe, Japan, on 19 March 1945. A valiant and forceful leader, calmly braving the perilous barriers of flame and twisted metal to aid his men and his ship, Lt. Comdr. O’Callahan groped his way through smoke-filled corridors to the shells, rockets, and other armament. With the ship rocked by incessant explosions, with debris and fragments raining down and fires raging in ever-increasing fury, he ministered to the wounded and dying, comforting and encouraging men of all faiths; he organized and led firefighting crews into the blazing inferno on the flight deck; he directed the jettisoning of live ammunition and the flooding of the magazine; he manned a hose to cool hot, armed bombs rolling dangerously on the listing deck, continuing his efforts, despite searing, suffocating smoke which forced men to fall back gasping and imperiled others who replaced them. Serving with courage, fortitude, and deep spiritual strength, Lt. Cmdr. O’Callahan.You can read more about Cpt. O’Callahan here

These brave men and women have given their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Have Every Right To Dream Heroic Dreams.
Those Who Say That We’re In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don’t Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero blogroll. If you would like to participate in honoring the brave men and women who serve this great country, you can find out how by clicking here.

military heroes


Responses

  1. I’m glad to see a chaplain receive the credit due to him.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Jacqui, do you know what happened to Father O’Callahan’s picture?

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks for pointing this out, GP. I repost this (with permission) from another blogger’s website. He must have grabbed a photo that was hosted on another website and is now not available. That’s why those sorts of images show up. I’m going to remove it.

      Thanks again for finding it!

      Liked by 1 person

      • I was planning on reblogging it this morning, and got 2 pictures to insert on it, but I wanted to hear from you first.

        Liked by 1 person

    • It’s called hotlinking. I don’t do it but I didn’t check these before posting. Glad you found others!

      Like

  3. Reblogged this on Pacific Paratrooper and commented:
    Author and mother of an Army Sergeant and Navy Lt. Commander presents a series of gallant history…

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Wonderful story. I found out about this on GP’s site.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for visiting. I’m a big fan of his. Most of my posts are about getting into USNA but for a while I had a series about American heroes. This is one. I’m glad you enjoyed it.

      Like

  5. May be mistaken on this but years and years ago I recall movie footage of a Navy chaplain ministering to wounded and dying sailors on a WWII aircraft carrier that I think was the Franklin. The footage may have been part of the Victory at Sea series. If it wasn’t real, it was a darn authentic recreation. Father O’Callahan certainly deserved the Medal of Honor.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Great story Jacqui. Thanks. Thanks to GP for reposting.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Thank you for sharing Cpt. Joseph O’Callahan with us. (I’m visiting you via GP’s blogpost. 🙂 )
    With you, I honor nd thank Cpt. Joseph O’Callahan!!!
    (((HUGS))),
    Carolyn 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • He’s a true hero at a time we needed them so badly. Thanks for dropping by!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Thank you for honoring a true American hero.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Thank you for sharing the information, about another great hero, and honoring him this way! Michael (P.S.: Coming from G.P. Cox’ blog! My great source for military information.)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah–agree about both–Joseph O’Callaghan was a hero and GP is amazing. Thanks for visiting!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Reblogged this on depolreablesunite.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for sharing this! I’ll come over and check it out.

      Like

  11. great story

    Liked by 1 person

  12. An excellent post and tribute to a selfless and herois man. Terrible events bring out the best in many people and WWII was no exception.

    Liked by 1 person

    • That last is so true. We really don’t know what we’ll do until challenged. I surprised myself when I almost got smashed into by a huge 18-wheeler with my two children in the car. I did everything right and lived to tell the story. I never would have predicted that.

      Not to compare my driving to this man’s heroism–of course.

      Liked by 1 person

      • You never know what you can do, until faced with a crisis. We are far stronger than we think.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Isn’t that the truth, Mark.

        Like

  13. Thank you for this wonderful story. My salute to Cpt O’Callaghan, and to you for making his admirable life known to us.

    Liked by 1 person


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