Posted by: Jacqui Murray | June 23, 2009

The Average USNA Candidate

Let me start there. What’s the average successful applicant look like, and is that my daughter. From the USNA website, usnaout of 11,259 applicants in 2009 (roughly 10% were admitted. Roughly 25% became qualified), I get:

Combined SAT & American College Testing (ACT) Program Scores

Score Ranges
SAT (ACT)
Verbal Math
>700(31-36)
28% 34%
600-699(26-30)
45% 53%
<600(<26)
27% 13%

Don’t know yet. Zoe’s taken PSAT’s. This looks like a wide range. Doable.

Rank in High School Class

First fifth 81.5%
Second fifth 13%
Third fifth 4%
Fourth fifth 1.3%
Fifth fifth 0.2%

She’s in Honors classes and knows she has to take the AP ones.

School Honors and Activities

Student body/council/government president or vice president 9%
Class president or vice president 9%
School club president or vice president 25%
School publication staff 24%
National Honor Society 59%
Varsity athletics 91%
Varsity letter winner 85%
Dramatics, public speaking, debating 85%
Leader of musical group 9%
Eagle Scout/Gold Award 13%
Boys/Girls State or Nation 14%
Reserve Officer Training Programs 10%
Sea Cadets 2%

Zoe’s not into school politics, but does music and sports. She’s on the journalism staff, but other than that she’s kinda shy.

The Class of 2009 includes 22.3% (272) minority midshipmen with ethnic backgrounds as follows: African Americans (69), Hispanics (115), Asian Americans (40), Native Americans (29), and Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders (19).

We got that one–Asian.

The Class of 2009 includes 19.3% (235) women.

The Class of 2009 includes 53 sons and 16 daughters of Naval Academy alumni (5.6%).

…and female, but not a son or daughter of a USNA alumni.

It’s a start.

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Responses

  1. […] the bare bones requirements here. Is that you? Now check the ‘average student’  here. Still in the running? Even if it’s not you right now, could it be in four years? If so, […]

  2. […] this post and you’ll see that 91% of successful candidates compete in Varsity athletics and 85% of them […]

  3. […] let’s talk about scholastic qualifications. Those who are accepted don’t necessarily have 4.8 GPA with a 2400 SAT. I’m not sure the Academy even wants […]

  4. […] the bare bones requirements here. Is that you? Now check the ‘average student’  here. Still in the running? Even if it’s not you right now, could it be in four years? If so, […]

  5. Howdy! Would you mind if I share your blog with my facebook group?

    There’s a lot of people that I think would really enjoy your content. Please let me know. Thanks

  6. […] let’s talk about scholastic qualifications. Those who are accepted don’t necessarily have a 4.8 GPA with a 2400 SAT. I’m not sure the Academy even wants […]

  7. […] the bare bones requirements here. Is that you? Now check the ‘average student’  here. Still in the running? Even if it’s not you right now, could it be in four years? If so, […]

  8. My daughter has went to a community college the last three years of high school gpa 3.94. She has taken all math and science including calculus 2 and physics she will graduate high school with an associates degree. She is a member of the college honor fraternity, has been on committees at school., is a lifeguard and volunteers three times weekly to teach swimming two hours nightly. She has Also volunteered in a school based health center. She has two interviews for nominations. My husband was a navy pilot and I was a navy nurse. My question is what else can she do to be a better candidate?

    • She sounds impressive. Lots of HS kids take college classes, but few graduate with an Associates. That will make her stand out–kudos to her.

      USNA likes team sports–as the Navy is a team effort. Has she participated in any of those? Even the debate squad? The other piece she might pursue before applying is some sort of leadership function–show she knows how to take charge.

      The interviews will make a big difference in how she’s perceived as a candidate, so I’ll be thinking positive thoughts for her. Good luck!

  9. […] The Average USNA Candidate–this may surprise you […]

  10. […] let’s talk about scholastic qualifications. Those who are accepted don’t necessarily have a 4.8 GPA with a 2400 SAT. I’m not sure the Academy even wants […]

  11. […] this post and you’ll see that 91% of successful candidates compete in Varsity athletics and 85% of them […]

  12. […] The Average USNA Candidate–this may surprise you […]

  13. What can I do to make myself more well-rounded applicant? I am a female sophomore, and these are my high points.
    1. NJROTC cadet, likely future Commanding or Executive Officer
    2. Swim team varsity letterman
    3. A-average in honors and AP courses
    4. A few awards/honors including Spanish language contest and Social Studies fair
    5. Sea Scout (lesser known branch of Boy Scouts), on track to Eagle Scout.
    6. Beta Club member

    • You sound pretty darn good, Stephanie. I think you’re doing everything right. The only additional piece I’d suggest is to add a leadership position. That can be in a club, a sport, with NJROTC (becoming a Commanding or Executive Officer) would qualify). Keep it up so the Selection Committee sees tenacity and endurance. Any way you can show that you handle stress well is good.

      Good luck!

  14. I want to know my chances of getting into the Naval Academy. I am only a freshman so I have time but I want to do as much as I possibly can. I am relatively smart taking all honors with mostly A’s. I am active in the following:
    Boy Scouts, almost Eagle scouts
    Model UN
    Life guarding
    EMS Cadets
    Swimming Club and School
    Trying out for Lacrosse
    Hoping to join Sea Cadets in the near future
    STEM Pathway
    Applying for National Honors Society and have enough hours to apply

    • Hi Matt

      Congrats on such a worthy goal! You will never be sorry. Even the preparation makes you more enticing to other schools.

      You have a good list of activities, well-balanced between sports and cerebral. Try to be a leader in as many as possible. If you can take AP or IB classes, do that also. Try to add 30+ volunteer hours to your college resume to show your servant-oriented mindset. I wish you the best of luck. Check in now and then to tell me how it’s going.

      • I just finished off the first marking period with all A’s and one B. I don’t think my high school does A-‘s and I am working on starting a MCJROTC program there. I was also elected as a patrol leader in the scouts and was accepted into 2 model UN programs. I’ve gotten further in depth with lifeguarding and EMS and am on the last rank before Eagle Scout and hope to finish that up soon.

      • Hi. I ended my first marking period with all A’s and one B+. I do not believe my school does A-‘s but will double check that. I am on the next rank before Eagle Scout and was elected to be a patrol leader in my troop. I made the varsity swim team and have gotten more active in lifeguarding and EMS. I was also accepted into 2 Model UN programs. I am also trying to start a MCJROTC program at my high school as there is none. I am hoping to join sea cadets when I get my Eagle as my plate is full right now with swim, lacrosse, and all the other things I am involved in.

      • This is a great start, Matt. Just keep it up, taking all the hardest classes your school offers and excelling at them.

  15. I am only a freshman in high school and I would really like to know what I should be doing right now to help me prepare for the USNA.

    I’m currently:
    Straight A student
    In many clubs such as FBLA, FFA, STUCO, Key Club, and band/marching band
    Going to do track this year and possibly cross country the following years
    In an accelerated math class
    Planning on doing volunteer work in the following years and getting a leadership position in a couple of clubs

    What more should I do and should I drop any classes to make room for more?
    Also, should I get a job later like lifeguarding and should I take swimming lessons?

    • Hi Hannah–you’re doing exactly what you should be doing: gathering information. Freshman year does count in your application, but is weighted a tad less than other high school years. Use this time (while you’re doing the best that you can) to research USNA, decide if it’s the best fit for you and your interests, develop a list of potential college choices and research them also, introduce yourself to your local Blue and Gold Officer. Always take the most difficult classes offered. Find places to showcase your leadership skills. holding down a job while taking difficult classes and participating in extra-curricular activities shows that you have the ability to juggle conflicting demands and succeed. Do as much as possible, even if it feels almost like too much.

      Good luck! Let me know how it goes.


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